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Episode 49: Interview with Marilyn Ray, Acoma Pueblo Potter~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Marilyn Ray, one of a large family of Acoma potters, talks about her family and the materials, techniques, and motifs used in her work..

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education)in the artist's home at Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico.

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Episode 48: Interview with Annie Manuel, Tohono O’odham Potter ~ View Now / Read Transcript
Potter Annie Manuel discusses her art and techniques..

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education)at a Culture Craft Saturday program at Arizona State Museum, May 2007.

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Episodes 4347:The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: A Living Document
Video of a symposium held at the University of Arizona on February 12, 2011, in conjunction with an exhibition of original and facsimile pages of the treaty.

More about the symposium, including synopses of the presentations and brief biographies of the speakers.

Amistades, Inc. LogoThis program was produced by Lisa Falk, Director of Education, Arizona State Museum, in collaboration with Amistades, Inc.Opens in a new window, the University of Arizona’s Office of the Vice President for Research, and the University's American Indian Studies department.

Pt. 1 View Now / Read Transcript
The Aftermath of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo:
Land Adjudication, Citizenship, and Immigration

Dr. LM Garcia y Griego

Pt. 2

View Now / Read Transcript
Between Our Lands: War, Negotiation and Purchase: Native Perspectives of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and Its Effects on the Yaqui People
Daniel Vega and Anabel Galindo
Pt. 3 View Now / Read Transcript
Abya Yala and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo—The Scars of Colonization: Perspectives on Citizenship, Nationality, Kinship and Territory from the Continental Indigenous Movement of Liberation of Abya Yala
Tupac Enrique Acosta
Pt. 4 View Now / Read Transcript
Culturas Fronterizas: Border Zones and Hybrid Identities
Dr. Enrique Lamadrid
Pt. 5 View Now / Read Transcript
Concluding Remarks
Dr. Michael Brescia

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Episode 42: Interview with Jennie Vicente, Zuni Jeweler ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Zuni silversmith and jeweler Jennie Vicente relates how she became a jeweler and describes her techniques.

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education) at the 2008 Southwest Indian Art Fair.

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Episode 41: Interview with Anthony Garcia, Pascua Yaqui Jeweler ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Yaqui silversmith and jeweler Anthony Garcia talks about his work and its inspiration.

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education) at the 2008 Southwest Indian Art Fair.

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Episode 40: The Naco Mammoth Excavation: Interview with George Cattanach ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Dr. George Cattanach, last surviving member of the student crew that excavated ASM’s famous 12,000 year-old mammoth in the early 1950s, talked in February 2010 about his experiences at the kill site near Naco, AZ, working under the direction of pre-eminent archaeologist Emil Haury. Dr. Cattanach had a long career as an archaeologist for the National Park Service and died in July 2011 at age 84.

Interview conducted by Nancy Odegaard (ASM Head of Preservation), Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman (ASM Associate Curator of Zooarchaeology) and Christina Bisulca (Conservator/Ph.D. Candidate UA Materials Science). Audio editing by Jamie Elyse Madden.

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Episodes 3539: Mexico, the Revolution and Beyond: The Casasola Archives 1900–1940
Video of a panel discussion held at the exhibition opening celebration

More on Casasola and his photographs

Arizona Humanities Council logoProgram organized by Lisa Falk, Director of Education, Arizona State Museum.
Program recorded and edited by Ryan T. Hurst.
Podcast made possible with support from the Arizona Humanities CouncilOpens in a new window.

Pt. 1

View Now / Read Transcript
Opening Remarks to Panel Discussion
The Honorable Juan Manuel Calderón Jaimes, Consul of Mexico in Tucson

Pt. 2

View Now / Read Transcript
Ten Days that Shook the World—the First Time: The Casasola Archives and the First Social Revolution
Dr. William Beezley, History Department, University of Arizona

Pt. 3

View Now / Read Transcript
The Mexican Revolution: 1810, 1910, 2010?
Dr. Roberto Cintli Rodríguez Mexican American Studies and Research Center, University of Arizona

Pt. 4

View Now / Read Transcript
Documenting the Revolution: Casasola and Corridos
Dr. Celestino Fernández, Sociology Department, University of Arizona
Corridos performed by Guillermo Sáenz

Pt. 5

View Now / Read Transcript
Reading Casasola's Photographs as Visual Documents
Cass Fey, Curator of Education, Center For Creative Photography, University of Arizona

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Episode 34: Interview with Zonnie Gorman: Hero's Daughter Discusses Navajo Code Talker Legacy ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Zonnie Gorman, daughter of Carl Gorman who was one of the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers, talks about the Code Talkers' important heritage of bravery within both the Navajo Nation and the United States.

Podcast originally produced by UA NewsOpens in a new window. Interview by Jeff Harrison.

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Episode 33: A Visit to “Beyond the Naked Eye: Science Reveals Nature’s Art,” with co-curator David Killick ~ View Now / Read Transcript
UA Professor of Anthropology David Killick discusses the exhibition during a visit by UA School of Art Professor Moira Geoffrion and her class in December 2008.

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Episode 32: Interview with Barbara Ornelas, Navajo Weaver ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Interview with Barbara Ornelas, a member of the Navajo Nation and a renowned weaver, about growing up with two languages, and her views on women and weaving.

Interview conducted by Maria Suarez Ruiz, senior in Creative Writing at the University of Arizona, Fall 2008.

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Episode 31: Interview with Sheilah Nicholas, Hopi, Professor of Language, Reading and Culture ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Interview with Sheilah Nicholas, a member of the Hopi Tribe, who is a professor in the Department of Language, Reading and Culture in the College of Education at the University of Arizona, about growing up with two languages, views on women, etc.

Interview conducted by Maria Suarez Ruiz, senior in Creative Writing at the University of Arizona, Fall 2008.

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Episode 30: Interview with Angie Hoffman, White Mountain Apache Teacher and Ph.D. Candidate ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Interview with Angie Hoffman, a member of the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Language Reading and Culture in the College of Education at the University of Arizona. In this interview she talks about her childhood, education, and language.

Interview conducted by Maria Suarez Ruiz, senior in Creative Writing at the University of Arizona, Fall 2008.

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Episode 29: Interview with Herbert Ben, Sandpainter (video) ~ View Now / Read Transcript
Herbert Ben is Navajo from Shiprock, New Mexico who comes from a family of sandpainters. He demonstrates how sandpainting is done and explains the difference between those done as part of ceremonies and those done as art.

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education) at the 2008 Southwest Indian Art Fair. Filmed and edited by Erich Healy.

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Episode 28: Interview with Allenroy Paquin, Silversmith (video) ~ View Now / Read Transcript
Allenroy Paquin is a silversmith and jeweler from Jicarilla Apache and Zuni. He shows us how he makes his silver jewelry and tells why jewelry-making is important in preserving family traditions and educating others about Native cultures.

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education) at the 2008 Southwest Indian Art Fair. Filmed and edited by Erich Healy.

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Episode 27: White Swann and her Children ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Interviews with award winning Hopi potter, White Swann and her children who are continuing the pottery-making tradition.

Interview conducted by Lisa Falk (ASM Director of Education) at the 2007 Southwest Indian Art Fair.

Episode 26: White Swann and her Children (enhanced - for iPod or iTunes) ~ Save & Listen

Please see our FAQ for more information about which version is best for you.

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Episodes 14–25: Masks of Mexico Audio Tour ~ Enhanced Version
A student-produced audio tour of the Masks of Mexico: Santos, Diablos y Más exhibition. The enhanced version (for iPod or iTunes) includes images. The tour is also available in a regular, audio-only version. Please see our FAQ for more information about which version is best for you. Although the tour episodes follow the order of the exhibition sections, you can listen in any order that strikes your fancy.

Pt.1

About the Tour (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
The Masks of Mexico audio tour was created by students Erich Healy, David Kemper, Shannon Kolder, and Adan Martinez-Kee as part of an internship at the University of Arizona. They worked under the direction of Lisa Falk, ASM director of education. The audio tour is a companion to the exhibition Masks of Mexico: Santos, Diablos y Más at the Arizona State Museum.

Pt.2 A World of Mexican Masks (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
Upon entering the exhibition, visitors see a wall full of masks. This outstanding mask collection continues to fascinate people. Meet Zarco Guerrero, a mask maker and educator living in Mesa, Arizona, who serves as our guide for the tour. Museum staff members discuss the allure of the masks, some history of the collection and how the museum works to preserve the masks. Hear from exhibit designer and co-curator Davison Koenig, exhibit co-curator Diane Dittemore, and conservator Teresa Moreno.
Pt.3 Of and for the Gods (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
Masks in Mexican culture have been important since Precolombian times. Tigre (jaguar) masks were part of religious ceremonies and represented fertility and power before the arrival of the Spanish. Today, in some rural towns, the jaguar dances are performed annually, continuing these ancient traditions. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares her knowledge.
Pt.4 The Reign of Spain (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
When the Spanish came to the Americas they played off the indigenous tradition of masked dramas. They used masks to overcome the language barrier, telling stories of their own greatness and spreading the message of Christianity. Dr. Lydia Otero of the University of Arizona shares her insights.
Pt.5 Parachicos Masked Drama (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
Masked dance dramas continue to be important elements of holiday celebrations in Mexico. Many versions exist of the story behind the Dance of the Parachicos. A common element is the blond-haired and blue-eyed Parachicos who were very kind to the young son of a wealthy woman who had become sick. In turn, she expressed her gratitude for his recovery by distributing food to the village. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares the story.
Pt.6 Viejitos Masked Drama (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
The Dance of the Viejitos is loved for the humor and range of emotions that are expressed. Although the dancers are young men, they play the characters of old men who share their life stories and, for a short time, relive their youth. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares the story.
Pt.7 Negritos Masked Drama (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
The Negrito masks of Uruapan, Michoacan are very distinctive and good examples of fine craftsmanship and artistry. Masks depicting black men represent many roles of black people in colonial Mexican society. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume talks about these various roles.
Pt.8 Día de los Muertos (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
In Mexico, death is commemorated on Día de los Muertos, at the start of November. Rather than a somber occasion, it is a time to celebrate life. The masks help you enter in the mood of celebration. Dr. Lydia Otero of the University of Arizona shares her insights.
Pt.9 Lucha Libre (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
Lucha Libre fighters are pop culture icons in Mexico today. In the wrestling ring, they enact the age-old drama of good vs. evil. The masks they wear are important aspects of the match to both spectators and luchadores. Learn about this fascinating sport and cultural phenomena from exhibit co-curator Davison Koenig and wrestlers Sol de Oriente and El Cuervo, and Eddie Veralde, a Nogales trainer of wrestlers.
Pt.10 Northwest Mexico (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
Masks are a part of secular and holy ceremonies and celebrations in Yoeme (Yaqui), Mayo and Tarahumara cultures of northern Mexico and southern Arizona. Among these communities there are variations in how the masks are decorated and the attitudes held about them. For some, certain masks are holy and will be burned after the ceremonies they are a part of; for others, some masks can be sold to outsiders. Yaqui educator and cultural specialist Felipe Molina shares his intimate knowledge of Yaqui masks traditions. ASM store manager Martin Kim talks about the difference between Yoeme and Mayo masks made in Sonora, Mexico, and the difference between those and the ones made in the Yaqui villages in Tucson, Arizona, USA.
Pt.11 El Taller (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
This section of the exhibition is a recreation of a mask carver's workshop. Craftsmen use many tools and materials to create their masks while they draw inspiration from both the traditional and the modern. Mask maker and our guide, Zarco Guerrero excites us with his knowledge of his craft.
Pt.12 The Essence of a Mask (enhanced) ~ Save & Listen
For those interested in collecting masks there are many elements to consider. Masks in Mexico are created for different reasons: as folk art, as components of religious ceremonies or traditional celebrations, as talismans... The story behind the mask may be the most valuable thing about it. ASM store manager Martin Kim shares his knowledge and understanding of collecting traditional art forms.

Gateway (logo)
Special Thanks to Gateway for their support of the Masks of Mexico Audio Tour.
Many thanks also to the University of Arizona Disability Resources Center for transcribing the tour episodes.

Top

Episodes 2–13: Masks of Mexico Audio Tour ~ Audio-only Version
A student-produced audio tour of the Masks of Mexico: Santos, Diablos y Más exhibition. The tour is also available in an enhanced version for iPod or iTunes, which includes images. Please see our FAQ for more information about which version is best for you. Although the tour episodes follow the order of the exhibition sections, you can listen in any order that strikes your fancy.

Pt.1 About the Tour ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
The Masks of Mexico audio tour was created by students Erich Healy, David Kemper, Shannon Kolder, and Adan Martinez-Kee as part of an internship at the University of Arizona. They worked under the direction of Lisa Falk, ASM director of education. The audio tour is a companion to the exhibition Masks of Mexico: Santos, Diablos y Más at the Arizona State Museum.
Pt.2 A World of Mexican Masks ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Upon entering the exhibition, visitors see a wall full of masks. This outstanding mask collection continues to fascinate people. Meet Zarco Guerrero, a mask maker and educator living in Mesa, Arizona, who serves as our guide for the tour. Museum staff members discuss the allure of the masks, some history of the collection and how the museum works to preserve the masks. Hear from exhibit designer and co-curator Davison Koenig, exhibit co-curator Diane Dittemore, and conservator Teresa Moreno.
Pt.3 Of and for the Gods ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Masks in Mexican culture have been important since Precolombian times. Tigre (jaguar) masks were part of religious ceremonies and represented fertility and power before the arrival of the Spanish. Today, in some rural towns, the jaguar dances are performed annually, continuing these ancient traditions. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares her knowledge.
Pt.4 The Reign of Spain ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
When the Spanish came to the Americas they played off the indigenous tradition of masked dramas. They used masks to overcome the language barrier, telling stories of their own greatness and spreading the message of Christianity. Dr. Lydia Otero of the University of Arizona shares her insights.
Pt.5 Parachicos Masked Drama ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Masked dance dramas continue to be important elements of holiday celebrations in Mexico. Many versions exist of the story behind the Dance of the Parachicos. A common element is the blond-haired and blue-eyed Parachicos who were very kind to the young son of a wealthy woman who had become sick. In turn, she expressed her gratitude for his recovery by distributing food to the village. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares the story.
Pt.6 Viejitos Masked Drama ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
The Dance of the Viejitos is loved for the humor and range of emotions that are expressed. Although the dancers are young men, they play the characters of old men who share their life stories and, for a short time, relive their youth. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume shares the story.
Pt.7 Negritos Masked Drama ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
The Negrito masks of Uruapan, Michoacan are very distinctive and good examples of fine craftsmanship and artistry. Masks depicting black men represent many roles of black people in colonial Mexican society. Gayle Castañeda of the Castañeda Museum of Ethnic Costume talks about these various roles.
Pt.8 Día de los Muertos ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
In Mexico, death is commemorated on Día de los Muertos, at the start of November. Rather than a somber occasion, it is a time to celebrate life. The masks help you enter in the mood of celebration. Dr. Lydia Otero of the University of Arizona shares her insights.
Pt.9 Lucha Libre ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Lucha Libre fighters are pop culture icons in Mexico today. In the wrestling ring, they enact the age-old drama of good vs. evil. The masks they wear are important aspects of the match to both spectators and luchadores. Learn about this fascinating sport and cultural phenomena from exhibit co-curator Davison Koenig and wrestlers Sol de Oriente and El Cuervo, and Eddie Veralde, a Nogales trainer of wrestlers.
Pt.10 Northwest Mexico ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Masks are a part of secular and holy ceremonies and celebrations in Yoeme (Yaqui), Mayo and Tarahumara cultures of northern Mexico and southern Arizona. Among these communities there are variations in how the masks are decorated and the attitudes held about them. For some, certain masks are holy and will be burned after the ceremonies they are a part of; for others, some masks can be sold to outsiders. Yaqui educator and cultural specialist Felipe Molina shares his intimate knowledge of Yaqui masks traditions. ASM store manager Martin Kim talks about the difference between Yoeme and Mayo masks made in Sonora, Mexico, and the difference between those and the ones made in the Yaqui villages in Tucson, Arizona, USA.
Pt.11 El Taller ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
This section of the exhibition is a recreation of a mask carver's workshop. Craftsmen use many tools and materials to create their masks while they draw inspiration from both the traditional and the modern. Mask maker and our guide, Zarco Guerrero excites us with his knowledge of his craft.
Pt.12 The Essence of a Mask ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
For those interested in collecting masks there are many elements to consider. Masks in Mexico are created for different reasons: as folk art, as components of religious ceremonies or traditional celebrations, as talismans... The story behind the mask may be the most valuable thing about it. ASM store manager Martin Kim shares his knowledge and understanding of collecting traditional art forms.

Gateway (logo)
Special Thanks to Gateway for their support of the Masks of Mexico Audio Tour.
Many thanks also to the University of Arizona Disability Resources Center for transcribing the tour episodes.

Top

Episode 1: Las Super Luchas ~ Listen Now / Read Transcript
Professional free-style masked wrestling in Mexico is deeply embedded in popular culture and is known as Lucha Libre. This "poor man's theater," which explores universal themes of good and evil, grew out of traditions of masked dances and ceremonies that extend back to pre-Hispanic times.

This audio feature was created by Nelson Warnell of KUAZ Radio at the University of Arizona for Arizona Spotlight (April 14, 2006). Used with permission.

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