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Nampeyo Timeline

c. 1860
Nampeyo born, Hano, First Mesa. Mother is White Corn, Tewa. Corn Clan, Hano (d. 1901-1909). Father is Quootsva, Hopi, Snake Clan, Walpi (d. 1897-1899). Oldest of four children.

 

Nampeyo with her mother, White Corn c. 1900.
Nampeyo with her mother, White Corn. Photo by James Mooney (1893). Smithsonian Institution #1875-B-1.

1875
Thomas Keam opens trading post at First Mesa, location called Peach Orchard Spring and later Keams Canyon.

Nampeyo as a young girl. Photo by William Henry Jackson (1875).
First photograph of Nampeyo, as a young girl. Photo by William Henry Jackson (1875).

c. 1878
Nampeyo marries Lesso, of Cedarwood clan, Walpi.

Nampeyo's husband, Lesso. Photo by Adam Clark Vroman (1901).
Nampeyo's husband, Lesso. Photo by Adam Clark Vroman (1901). Courtesy of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, now part of The Autry National Center.

c. 1880
Anthropologist Alexander Stephen arrives at Keams Canyon.  He is official Post Master when post office is established in 1883.

1880s
Beginning of manufacture of Sikyatki Revival Pottery. Thomas Keam encourages potters to make pottery with designs inspired by pottery recovered from nearby protohistoric (c. 1400-1600) sites. Nampeyo among the potters to participate in this revival.

The story is oft repeated that Nampeyo became aware of the designs when husband Lesso worked for Fewkes' 1895 excavation at Sikyatki. Yet, there is no record of Lesso ever having worked for Fewkes, and "revival" pottery production predates Fewkes' work by at least 10-15 years.

1882
Railroad completed through Winslow.

 

c. 1884
First daughter Annie (Healing) born (d. 1968).

Annie Healing with selection of pottery. Photo by Adam Clark Vroman (1901).
Annie Healing with selection of pottery. Photo by Adam Clark Vroman (1901).

1886
First Hemenway Expedition to Southwest, headed by Frank Hamilton Cushing.

 

1887
School established at Keams Canyon for Hopi children.

 

1891-1892
Second Hemenway Expedition to Hopi, headed by Jesse Walter Fewkes.

 

1892
Fewkes purchases collection of over 3000 Hopi ceramic pieces from trader Keams for $10,000.

 

c. 1893
Son William Lesso born (d. 1935).

 

1893
Mennonite missionary H.R. Voth arrives at Hopi.

Hopi gathered in front of the Voth home at Christmas time (c. 1895)
Hopi gathered in front of the Voth home at Christmas time. Photo by H.R. Voth (c. 1895). Courtesy of Bethel College, Kansas, Mennonite LIbrary and Archives.

1896
Second daughter Nellie (Douma) born (d. 1978).

 

1899
Son Wesley Lesso born (d. 1985).

 

1900
Daughter Fannie born (d. 1987).

 

1900-1925
Photographer E.S. Curtis visits Hopi numerous times.  Photographs Nampeyo, her mother and her daughter Nellie.

 

1901
Adam Clark Vroman, photographer for National Museum Gates exposition, comes to Hopi.   Photographs Nampeyo, Lesso, Annie and  Annie's daughter  Rachel.

 

1902
Thomas Keam sells trading post to Lorenzo Hubbell, Sr., his son, Lorenzo Jr. manages it.

 

1905-1906
Nampeyo demonstrates at "Hopi House" Grand Canyon.

Nampeyo & family members with pottery in front of 'Hopi House' at the Grand Canyon. Photographer unknown (1905).
Nampeyo & family members with pottery in front of "Hopi House" at the Grand Canyon. Photographer unknown (1905).

1910
Nampeyo, Lesso, Nellie and Nellie's friend Ida Avayo go to Chicago United States Land and Irrigation Exposition so that Nampeyo can demonstrate  her pottery-making techniques.

 

1942
 Nampeyo dies at home of son, Wesley and his wife Cecilia Polocca.

Nampeyo in her mid 70's, holding a pot she has just made (1935).
Nampeyo in her mid 70's, holding a pot she has just made. Photo by Tad Nichols (1935).