The University of Arizona
 

Current and Upcoming Exhibitions at Arizona State Museum

Overview tours of the exhibits with our friendly and knowledgeable docents!

student self portrait

October 18, 2014 - March 31, 2015
Photo ID: Portraits By Native Youth
Native American high school students from Ha:san Preparatory and Leadership School in Tucson share their own photographic portraits, in response to the early 20th century photographs of American Indians by Edward S. Curtis. Concepts of identity and self expression are explored in the students' work. View the online exhibition now.

This exhibit is supported in part by Arizona Humanities

“People of Peace” by Marla Allison (Laguna Pueblo)

October 18, 2014March 31, 2015
Regarding Curtis: Contemporary Indian Artists Respond to the Imagery of Edward S. Curtis
Whether romanticized or contested, the enduring power of the imagery of Edward S. Curtis has informed contemporary notions of Native American identity and perception. By inviting contemporary Indian artists to respond to these issues of identity and perception, we carry this dialogue into the present day, both visually and intellectually.

Aerial photoPueblo Room Blocks in Snow, Puye Pueblo, Santa Clara Indian Reservation (detail), 2001, by Adriel Heisey

February 8September 20, 2014
From Above: Images of a Storied Land

Internationally acclaimed aerial photographer Adriel Heisey shares his breathtaking work in this exhibit curated by Archaeology Southwest. Sixty large-format, high-definition, aerial images give us a fresh perspective on historical landscapes and archaeological sites across the region, allowing us to see them again, as if for the first time. Your appreciation for the complexity, beauty, and fragility of Chaco Canyon, First Mesa, Tumamoc Hill, and many other storied places, will reach new heights as you see them From Above.

More About From Above

This traveling exhibit is brought to you in partnership with, and through the generosity of,

Sepia-tone photo of a young womanMosa-Mohave, 1903. Photogravure by Edward S. Curtis

Now through July 18, 2015
Curtis Reframed: The Arizona Portfolios

In the early decades of the 20th century, famed photographer of the American West Edward S. Curtis created and published a vast photographic record of North American Indians. These iconic images have generated controversyOpens in a new window even as they have fascinated generations of viewers. Photogravures from the permanent collections of the Arizona State Museum and examples of the copper plates from the collections of the Center for Creative PhotographyOpens in a new window explore Curtis’s work with 13 Arizona tribes from 1903 to 1928. Twenty images will be exhibited at one time, then rotated after six months, for a total of sixty over the life of the exhibit.

Family Fun Activity: Be a Photo DetectiveOpens in a new window (PDF* - 854K)

This exhibit is made possible by the generosity of: Lewis Framing Studio, LLC; Eldon and Jean Smith; Jaye Smith and William Lawrence; The Joseph and Mary Cacioppo Foundation; and Tru Vue, Inc.Opens in a new window Promotional considerations provided by Arizona Public Media.

Visitors view the Wall of PotsPhoto by Jannelle Weakly

Ongoing
The Pottery Project

Explore the art of the potter and the science of the archaeologist as Arizona State Museum celebrates 2,000 years of Native pottery-making traditions in the Southwest. At 20,000+ whole vessels, ASM’s collection of Southwest Indian pottery is the world’s largest and most comprehensive! The Pottery Project features the Arnold and Doris Roland Wall of Pots, the Agnese and Emil Haury Southwest Native Nations Pottery Vault, a state-of-the-art conservation laboratory. The exhibit includes a test version of the "Virtual Vault," video interviews with archaeologists and Native potters, and hands-on experiences.

More About The Pottery Project
Wall of Pots Online Exhibit
Time-lapse Video - Filling the Wall
Ancient to Modern: Southwest Indian Pottery App

Ongoing
Paths of Life: American Indians of the Southwest

Apache Gaan dancers

Diorama of Mountain Spirit Dancers in “Paths of Life”
Photo by ASM Staff

Explore the origins, histories, and contemporary lifeways of ten Native cultures in an exciting mix of prehistoric artifacts, historic objects, life-size dioramas, and audio/video presentations.

See, hear, and touch highlights of the Yaqui, O’odham, Apache, Navajo, and Hopi sections of the ground-breaking Paths of Life exhibition with knowledgeable guides. A full tour covers five culture groups and lasts 60 minutes, but can be customized to include two or three culture groups and shortened to 30 or 45 minutes upon request. While docent tours are geared toward adults, all ages are welcome.

Tours are free with paid admission.

Tour Schedule

Special Request tours are scheduled in advance online, and allow you to request and reserve the tour of your choice at a specific start time. Special Request tours are available for groups of four or more, and required for groups of 10 or more. See below for tour options and instructions.

Drop-in tours are the same as “Special Request” tours, but are provided on a first-come / first-served basis during regular docent shifts, Tuesday–Saturday afternoons October 15 through April 30. Drop-in tours start at 1 p.m. If the 1 p.m tours are full and there is enough demand, docents will be available to repeat tours or answer questions until 3 p.m. Ask at the front desk for drop-in tour availability when you visit ASM!

Use the online Special Request Tour Form to schedule a tour, or email Mackenzie Massman for more information. A minimum two-week advance notice is required to process Special Request tours.

All docent-led tours and activities are subject to change according to docent availability.

More About Paths of Life (including an online panoramic tour)

Waiting for Grandfather by John SuazoPhoto by ASM Staff

Waiting for Grandfather, a 168 cm. tall limestone sculpture by Taos Pueblo artist John Suazo, graces the entrance to ASM's south building. A gift from the family of Burt and Brenda Lazar, “Waiting for Grandfather” was installed by Arizona State Museum January 2013 and is among more than 40 outdoor public art installations that enhance the University of Arizona campus.

“Every detail has meaning to me because every piece begins deep inside me,” the artist says. “The young woman is waiting anxiously to see Grandfather, to show her baby to him because he has not yet seen the child. The belt around her skirt is like the one my grandmother used to wear. The stairstep design at the bottom of the woman’s skirt represents the steps we take in life. I hope that by looking at my work, one can find a missing piece of knowledge in themselves.”

Installation of Waiting for Grandfather was generously underwritten by the Friends of the ASM Collections.

More about John Suazo from Turquoise MagazineOpens in a new window and American Indian Computer Art Project.Opens in a new window (PDF*)

"Watercarrier Statue"Photo by Jannelle Weakly

Watercarrier, a bronze sculpture by Apache artist Craig Dan Goseyun, adorns the front entrance of ASM's north building. Purchased by Arnold and Doris Roland as a generous gift to the museum, "Watercarrier" represents one of the most vital elements to a desert community—water.

"Water is one of the most important resources. Practically all cultures throughout the world at one time or another transported their goods balanced on top of their head on the center of gravity. The woman is wearing a garment that covers her full body. The swirl represents the connection between the earth and sky." —Craig Dan Goseyun

More About Watercarrier and Craig GoseyunOpens in a new window from Indian Country Today

Docent-led Orientation Tours

Get a taste and see the highlights of the current exhibits at Arizona State Museum! General orientation and overview tours last about 30 minutes. While docent tours are geared toward adults, all ages are welcome.

Tours are free with paid admission.

Tour Schedule

Special Request tours are scheduled in advance online, and allow you to request and reserve the tour of your choice at a specific start time. Special Request tours are available for groups of four or more, and required for groups of 10 or more. See below for tour options and instructions.

Drop-in tours are the same as “Special Request” tours, but are provided on a first-come / first-served basis during regular docent shifts, Tuesday–Saturday afternoons October 15 through April 30. Drop-in tours start at 1 p.m. If the 1 p.m tours are full and there is enough demand, docents will be available to repeat tours or answer questions until 3 p.m. Ask at the front desk for drop-in tour availability when you visit ASM!

Use the online Special Request Tour Form to schedule a tour, or email Mackenzie Massman for more information. A minimum two-week advance notice is required to process Special Request tours.

All docent-led tours and activities are subject to change according to docent availability.

Don't forget to visit our Online Exhibitions


Please Note: No backpacks, satchels, food or drinks are allowed in the exhibit galleries. All items are subject to search.


This icon New window icon indicates link opens in a new window.

* PDF requires a reader application such as Adobe Acrobat ReaderOpens in a new window

Sign up today to be notified of upcoming events, programs, and exhibits at Arizona State Museum.

  * = Required Field

If you wish to be removed from the ASM mailing list please contact Darlene Lizarraga.

We will use your e-mail address only for the purpose of informing you of museum business. We do not sell or disclose e-mail addresses to other organizations.
Privacy Statement